The pace of John the Baptist

The pace of John the Baptist

How is your pace this December?  Are you caught up in the Christmas rush?  Or are you keeping an Advent pace?  With all of the Christmas glitz in stores, it is easy to lose sight of Advent.  We need an Advent pace more than the Christmas rush.  The pace of Advent is quieter.  It helps us focus on God.  It is life-giving, rather than draining.

On the Second Sunday of Advent, John the Baptist grabs our attention and invites us to some quiet time in the desert.  John was “in the desert proclaiming a baptism of repentance” (Mark 1:4).  The desert is a place without distractions…. a place to focus on God.  John is fixated on God.   And he preaches repentance to focus our hearts on Jesus’ coming.

His clothing of camel’s hair with a leather belt was like the prophet Elijah (2 Kings 1:4).  John appears as the long-awaited Elijah-like prophet to announce the Day of the Lord.  He is a prophet in the desert.

“He fed on locusts and wild honey” (Mark 1:6).  This is the food of desert dwellers.  It must have taken a lot of honey to sweeten the bitter locusts!  John wasn’t afraid of roughing it.  He would have fared well in Wyoming.  Seriously, locusts and wild honey are the food of a poor man living in the desert ….. a man of humility, who depends on God for sustenance.  John lived simply.  He shows us a pace of simplicity and an attitude of humility. He has a single focus.   He is God-centered.

The Advent pace is one of simplicity, humility and being God-centered.

How can you adjust your pace in this way? …… to live in simplicity, humility and God-centered.

Find some desert time.  Take quiet time in nature where you are alone with God.  Eat a light lunch by yourself and read a Scripture passage.  Make space for God’s voice to be heard.  It will be life-giving.  Have you been eating lots of Christmas goodies?  How about simplifying your diet or fasting so that you get in touch with your hunger for God?

To eat “locusts and wild honey” is minimal nourishment.  Like the people of Israel who journeyed in the desert, John’s primary food was the Word of God.  John the Baptist ate God’s word.  He calls us to the desert to feed on the Word and experience anew the sustaining power of God.

He points toward Christ and says, “One mightier than I is coming after me.  I am not fit to stoop and loosen the straps of his sandals” (Mark 1:7).  Little John is in touch with God Almighty.

An Advent pace restores our perspective.  We’re not in control.  We are puny people created to live for God alone.  Humility puts us back in touch with God’s greatness, and it eases our worries.  Then we realize that it’s not our work.  Rather, when I walk in humility, I put myself under God’s guidance.  I trust in his power to get things done.

Humility helps me be God-centered.  And being centered on God produces freedom.  Little John was free.  He didn’t care what anybody else thought.  This interior freedom is the opposite of constant worry of what others think or say about me.

He only cared about one thing – who he was before God.  He only did one thing in life – he pointed out Christ.  In religious art, John the Baptist is depicted as pointing to Christ.  He announced, “One mightier than I is coming after me.”

 The Advent pace is one of simplicity, humility and being God-centered.  Advent refocuses us on one thing.  On Christ who came with mighty power.  On Christ who is coming again.

Now and then we meet people like John.  They are so focused on God that they make you stare God in the face.  As a seminarian I had the opportunity to meet Mother Theresa.  While standing in line, she challenged the person standing in front of me with a stern question, “What are you doing for Jesus?”  Her question pierced my heart.  It stuck in my mind.

Mother Theresa was God-centered.  Like Little John, she was a tiny woman with a piercing presence.  Why?  She was totally focused on God, and she was free inside.  That is the fruit of an Advent pace.  It produces humility, a single focus and freedom.

Sometimes we see this focus and freedom in our youth.  Three years ago, I celebrated the Sacrament of Confirmation in Lead, SD.  In preparation for her confirmation, one girl wrote, “If I could do one thing to make myself a better follower of Jesus, I would dedicate more time to him.  I think the main reason people drift away is because they just ‘don’t have the time.’  There should ALWAYS be time for Jesus.  So I need to find more time than a prayer before bed for him.  He gave his life for me.  I should be able to give him more than five minutes of my day.”

The Advent pace is one of simplicity, humility and being God-centered.

What do you need to do to walk in the pace of John the Baptist?

 

 

 


4 thoughts on “The pace of John the Baptist

  1. Thank you so much Bishop for the awesome homily, I’m studying on John the cross right now and your homily couldn’t fit in more perfect he’s an awesome saint and teaches so much.
    I broke my kneecap yesterday so I’m going to have a lot of good meditation time.
    God bless you richly and God bless you richly and I thank the Lord that he gave you to us in Wyoming. Marium

  2. Thank you so much for this word of Wisdom and encouraging us to keep focused. May Jesus’ gifts of His special Presence bless your heart this Advent and Christmas and into the New Year.
    Love and prayers – Pat

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