Gazing on the crucified Christ.

Gazing on the crucified Christ.

Today, I was at Holy Trinity parish in Cheyenne where seminarian Dylan Ostdiek was instituted in the Ministry of Acolyte.  Below is the homily from that Mass.

The Ministry of Acolyte is one of the steps for seminarians as they prepare for ordination.  Both permanent deacons and priests receive this ministry before they are ordained.  The Ministry of Acolyte includes serving at the altar, distributing the Eucharist at Mass and bringing Communion to the sick.  For Dylan, this is another step closer to priesthood….. and a step closer to the altar.  It is a step closer to standing at the altar as a priest.  The closer you get to the altar, the more you need to become like Christ.

That is true for Altar Servers and for lay Eucharistic Ministers.  To be an Altar Server or a Eucharistic Minister is to draw near to Jesus on the cross. As Catholics, we are required to have a crucifix near the altar.  The two go together.  The sacrifice of the cross is poured out on the altar.  The mystery of the cross is renewed at every Eucharist.  That is why we treasure the Eucharist as the greatest Sacrament.  We call it the most Blessed Sacrament.  It is the most powerful presence of God on earth.

To be near the altar is to be transformed by the mystery of the cross.  As Dylan steps closer to the altar today, he is being called to a deeper transformation in Christ.  That applies to every single person who approaches the altar to receive Communion.  St. Paul helps us to reflect on the mystery of our transformation in Christ.  His letter to the Philippians is one the most beautiful descriptions of Christ’s love and our call to imitate him.

“Though he was in the form of God, Jesus did not regard equality with God something to be grasped. 

Rather, he emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, coming in human likeness . . . .

he humbled himself, becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross” (Phil. 2:6-8). 

This is an early Christian hymn.  It was written around the year 50 A.D. and sung by the first Christians.  Even though he was GOD, Jesus emptied himself into weak human flesh.  He lowered himself to be with us in sickness, in the brokenness of sin, in the darkness of death.  As the first Christians looked at the crucified Jesus, they described his love by saying “He EMPTIED himself.”  He poured himself out for us.  He selflessly gave his life for sinful humanity.

“Taking the form of a slave, he humbled himself.”  God’s Son knelt down and washed the feet of those who would deny and betray him.  He washed unfaithful disciples in his Mercy.  He used his power as God to seek out wayward sinners and fill us with divine Life.  “He EMPTIED himself.”  That is the mystery of the cross, which we receive at every Eucharist.

In the summer of 2003, I learned about an Italian saint who as a little boy experienced the mystery of the cross.  Some Italians introduced me to St. Guido Maria Conforti.  As a little boy, Guido would stop in his parish church on the way to school.  He said, “On my way to school, I used to stop at the Church and gaze at the crucifix:  I looked at him and he looked at me, and it seemed as though he was telling me many things.”  This began when he was nine years old!

The crucifix in the church captured his heart.  As a nine-year-old boy, he was being transformed by the love that spoke to him from the crucifix.  Second graders who are being prepared for First Communion are capable of being transformed by the deep love of the crucified Jesus.  All they need to do is be silent and gaze at a crucifix each day.

As I visit homes of young families, I see fewer crucifixes these days.  The tendency seems to be to have decorative crosses like you might buy in a department store, but crosses without the body of Jesus.   The danger is to lose the stark beauty of the crucified Jesus who speaks so powerfully of the Father’s love.  Parents, in your homes do your children have a crucifix to gaze at?

As an adult, St Guido wrote, The Crucifix is the sum total of the wisdom and of the power of God, the summary of the Gospel.”  St. Paul speaks of how the cross should FORM us.  If we are not being TRANSFORMED by the cross, we are failing to be disciples.  St. Paul wrote,

“If there is any encouragement in Christ, any solace in love, any participation in the Spirit,

and any compassion and mercy,complete my joy by being of the same mind . . .

Have the same attitude that is also in Christ Jesus”  (Phil. 2:1-2, 5).

In other words, “If the mystery of Christ’s love has had any effect on you, if you have had any experience of his compassion and mercy, if the Holy Spirit has touched your heart, then have the attitude of Christ.”  EMPTY yourself by serving others.  Take the posture of a SLAVE.  Wash the feet of your enemies.

St. Guido wrote, “The crucifix is the master book from which saints were made and from which we also ought to be formed. . . . The crucifix speaks to us with the eloquence that has no equal, with eloquence of sacred blood.”

Let the mystery of the cross transform you.  Gaze at the crucifix each day.  As you share the one Bread of the Eucharist with your brothers and sisters in Christ, so you become one Body with them.  Show a sincere love for Christ’s Mystical Body, God’s holy people, especially for the weak and the sick.

Today’s Gospel reminds us of Jesus ministry to the weak and those despised as hopeless sinners – tax collectors and prostitutes (Matt. 21:28-32).  Ask the Lord Jesus to give you his attitude for his least brothers and sisters.  This is the challenge for all of us who come to the altar.

“If there is any encouragement in Christ, any solace in love, any participation in the Spirit,

and any compassion and mercy, complete my joy by being of the same mind . . .

Have the same attitude that is also in Christ Jesus.”

As Jesus said at the Last Supper, “Love one another, as I have loved you.” 

If he can capture the heart of a nine-year-old boy, who was transformed by gazing at a crucifix each day, then he can transform us.  As you receive Eucharist today, gaze on the crucified Lord who EMPTIES himself into your hands and hearts.  Then ask for the same attitude that is in Christ Jesus.


One thought on “Gazing on the crucified Christ.

  1. I loved listening to this homily! We are a family that has several crucifixes in our home. One of them has been in my husband’s family for years and it was given to me by my mother-in-law, who was my sponsor, when I became a confirmed Catholic a few years ago. We have another crucifix that I was also given at confirmation. They both hang over our bedroom doors ( my daughter’s and my husband and I’s). My daughter loves Jesus so much that she’s made up beautiful songs she likes to sing randomly throughout the day 🙂
    It also was a pleasure meeting you today after mass. You’re welcome to visit our home any time for supper or tea and coffee.
    I enjoy reading your blog.

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